advertisement

Follow Mint Lounge

Latest Issue

Home > Smart Living> Innovation > Japan's Nintendo game console pioneer Uemura dies at 78

Japan's Nintendo game console pioneer Uemura dies at 78

Uemura was the lead architect behind the Nintendo Entertainment System, which became a global hit and sold more than 60 million consoles worldwide

A man walks by Switch from Nintendo at an electronics retail chain store in Tokyo on Oct. 13, 2021.  (AP)

Listen to this article

Masayuki Uemura, a Japanese home computer game pioneer whose Nintendo consoles sold millions of units worldwide, has died, according to the university in Kyoto where he taught. He was 78.

Uemura, the lead architect behind Nintendo Co.'s trailblazing home game consoles, died Monday, Ritsumeikan University said in a statement. The cause of his death was not released.

Also read: Nintendo's Switch video game console faces a 4K glitch

Born in Tokyo in 1943, Uemura studied electronic engineering at the Chiba Institute of Technology and joined Nintendo in 1971.

Uemura was tasked by then-president Hiroshi Yamauchi in 1981 with developing a home console for games like Donkey Kong, which was a huge hit in the United States at the time but only available for arcade use.

The so-called Famicom game system hit the Japanese market in 1983 as Nintendo's first cartridge-based console, allowing users to play popular games that came in cassette formats. The upgraded Super Famicom was released in Japan in 1990.

FILE PHOTO: Masayuki Uemura, a Japanese home computer game pioneer whose Nintendo consoles sold millions of units worldwide, poses for a photo in Japan on July 10, 2013.
FILE PHOTO: Masayuki Uemura, a Japanese home computer game pioneer whose Nintendo consoles sold millions of units worldwide, poses for a photo in Japan on July 10, 2013. (AP)

The Nintendo Entertainment System, as it was known, hit the United States in 1985 and eventually became a global sensation with more than 60 million consoles sold worldwide, bringing international recognition to a company that previously made traditional Japanese card games, other playing cards and toys.

After retiring from Nintendo, Uemura taught game studies starting in 2004 at Ritsumeikan University in the ancient Japanese capital, which is also home to Nintendo.

"We offer our heartfelt appreciation for Mr. Uemura's huge contributions to the development of the game industry by introducing a variety of video game consoles including family computers," Ritsumeikan University said in a statement. “May he rest in peace."

Recently, Nintendo said that global chip shortage had affected the company as well. In November, the president of the Japanese video-game maker had said the shortage in computer chips needed to make the Nintendo Switch machine was a serious problem, which was unlikely to be resolved soon.

In an Associated Press report, Shuntaro Furukawa said the dearth of computer chips, which was affecting manufacturing of many products, was behind Nintendo's decision to cut its forecast for Switch sales for the fiscal year through March to 24 million machines from an earlier 25.5 million units. Furukawa said plans for the next fiscal year and beyond were even more difficult to predict.

Also read: Global chip shortage hits Apple and may delay your iPhone delivery

(With inputs from AP)

Next Story