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Home > Smart Living> Innovation > From Dyson to Nike, everyone wants a piece of the metaverse

From Dyson to Nike, everyone wants a piece of the metaverse

As buzz around the ‘metaverse’, a shared virtual world, continues to grow, consumer goods companies are testing newer ways to interact with customers

Engineers work on Dyson's virtual reality product testing, at Dyson Technology Campus, in Malmesbury, Britain, in this undated handout image obtained by Reuters on November 18, 2021.
Engineers work on Dyson's virtual reality product testing, at Dyson Technology Campus, in Malmesbury, Britain, in this undated handout image obtained by Reuters on November 18, 2021. (via REUTERS)

If you thought all the discussion around the ‘metaverse’ would slow down after Facebook renamed itself Meta last month, then rest assured that there is a lot more on the way.

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The ‘metaverse’ is a shared virtual world where people can interact with each other, participate in different events and activities, and digitally shop in the form of avatars. According to a recent Reuters report, the global metaverse market is expected to reach $6.16 billion in 2021 and $41.62 billion by 2026, based on data from research firm Strategy Analytics.

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Also read: The next big internet revolution: what is the metaverse?

Earlier this week, sportswear brand Nike and technology company Dyson announced some interesting updates about how they plan to use this space. On Thursday, Nike revealed a virtual world modeled after its headquarters on video game platform Roblox, becoming one of the first big brands to enter the metaverse. This digital space, called “NIKELAND”, will allow players to design their avatar with special Nike products and is free for anyone to visit on Roblox.

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Visitors can currently play games such as “Tag”, “The Floor Is Lava” and “Dodgeball” on the platform, a Reuters report explains. The platform also lets creators design their own mini-games from interactive sports materials. Interestingly, on NIKELAND, visitors can use the accelerometers in their mobile devices to transfer offline movement to online play, allowing real-life movement in the digital space, the Reuters report adds.

A demonstration of Dyson's virtual reality testing of The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer products, at Dyson Technology Campus, in Malmesbury, Britain.
A demonstration of Dyson's virtual reality testing of The Dyson Supersonic hairdryer products, at Dyson Technology Campus, in Malmesbury, Britain. (via REUTERS)

Similarly, Dyson, the renowned British technology company, announced on Friday that customers will now be able to test its products -- everything from hairdryers, straighteners and stylers -- from their home through virtual reality. The Dyson Demo VR has been built with the same visualisation and simulation technology used by its engineers to prototype, test and develop new products and software, a Reuters report explains. James Dyson, company founder and chief engineer, said in the report that VR was a way to improve people's understanding of the company's products.

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According to a statement, this virtual-reality showroom was an extension of selling direct to consumers though its 318 stores and website and would be available through VR headset Oculus' headset store from Friday.

Sean Newmarch, the global ecommerce director for Dyson, said in the Reuters report that in the future the Dyson Demo VR would also incorporate a fully integrated e-commerce solution and the ability to talk to a real salesperson. For now, it would launch with Dyson's hair care products, with the floor care range set to follow next.

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(With inputs from Reuters)

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Also read: Missing the moment: Will virtual reality ever take off?

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