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Home > Smart Living> Environment > Wildlife wonders of the Tamiraparani river

Wildlife wonders of the Tamiraparani river

Trails of Tamiraparani – a new coffee table book – captures the flora and fauna, and cultural changes around the river that originates from the southern Western Ghats

The Galaxy Frog is an endangered species found in the southern part of western ghats or the Kurinji (mountain) landscape of Tirunelveli district. This ground-dwelling frog stands out for its distinct colours. Published by ATREE's Agasthyamalai Community Conservation Centre team, the book documents the flora and fauna found across the five landscapes through which the Tamiraparani river flows. It's based on the description from Sangam literature.
The Galaxy Frog is an endangered species found in the southern part of western ghats or the Kurinji (mountain) landscape of Tirunelveli district. This ground-dwelling frog stands out for its distinct colours. Published by ATREE's Agasthyamalai Community Conservation Centre team, the book documents the flora and fauna found across the five landscapes through which the Tamiraparani river flows. It's based on the description from Sangam literature. (Surya Narayanan)
Another resident of the mountain region, this is the first photo of a Malabar Spiny Dormouse in the wild. This nocturnal mammal is elusive and has not been documented much due to the difficulties in spotting it. It is currently listed as a vulnerable species by IUCN.
Another resident of the mountain region, this is the first photo of a Malabar Spiny Dormouse in the wild. This nocturnal mammal is elusive and has not been documented much due to the difficulties in spotting it. It is currently listed as a vulnerable species by IUCN. (Dr R Ganesan)
The Cullinea tree is considered the keystone species of the Mulai (shrubby forest) landscape. Besides helping various animals, insects and birds thrive, the tree has a symbiotic relationship with lion-tailed macaques. While the macaques are completely dependent on this tree species for food, they also help Cullinea trees to spread their seeds. 
The Cullinea tree is considered the keystone species of the Mulai (shrubby forest) landscape. Besides helping various animals, insects and birds thrive, the tree has a symbiotic relationship with lion-tailed macaques. While the macaques are completely dependent on this tree species for food, they also help Cullinea trees to spread their seeds.  (Dr R Ganesan)
The white stork is a notable species that is observed in the Marutham (plains or farmland) landscape. These migratory birds visit the region from Europe between September and March, and are mentioned in great detail in Sangam literature era (spanning 300 BCE to 300 CE) poetry. They are mostly seen around paddy fields and in shallow waters. 
The white stork is a notable species that is observed in the Marutham (plains or farmland) landscape. These migratory birds visit the region from Europe between September and March, and are mentioned in great detail in Sangam literature era (spanning 300 BCE to 300 CE) poetry. They are mostly seen around paddy fields and in shallow waters.  (Vinod M Kumar)
The Fan-throated lizard is so adaptable that it is found not only in the Palai (desert) landscape but also in the plains. One can often spot this lizard lifting its body and running fast across the red sand dunes.
The Fan-throated lizard is so adaptable that it is found not only in the Palai (desert) landscape but also in the plains. One can often spot this lizard lifting its body and running fast across the red sand dunes. (Vinod M Kumar)
Lastly, the book highlights Neithal Zoanthids, an often overlooked sea anemone like species from the Neythal (seashore) landscape. Although commonly found on rocky surfaces around seashores, their habitat is under threat from embankment walls that have been built in recent years. 
Lastly, the book highlights Neithal Zoanthids, an often overlooked sea anemone like species from the Neythal (seashore) landscape. Although commonly found on rocky surfaces around seashores, their habitat is under threat from embankment walls that have been built in recent years.  (Paventhar V)

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