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Home > Smart Living> Environment > Remains of small armor-plated dinosaur found in Argentina

Remains of small armor-plated dinosaur found in Argentina

Scientists say this marks a first-of-its-kind discovery of an armored dinosaur from the Cretaceous period in South America

Palaeontologists work on the excavation of bones and fossils that belonged to a newly discovered species of bipedal armoured dinosaur, Jakapil kaniukura, in Rio Negro, Argentina February 6, 2019. 
Palaeontologists work on the excavation of bones and fossils that belonged to a newly discovered species of bipedal armoured dinosaur, Jakapil kaniukura, in Rio Negro, Argentina February 6, 2019.  (REUTERS)

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Buenos Aires, Reuters: Paleontologists on Thursday heralded the discovery of a previously unknown small armored dinosaur in southern Argentina, a creature that likely walked upright on its back legs roaming a then-steamy landscape about 100 million years ago.

The Cretaceous Period dinosaur, named Jakapil kaniukura, would have been well-protected with rows of bony disk-shaped armor along its neck and back and down to its tail, they said. It measured about 5 feet (1.5 meters) long and weighed only 9 to 15 pounds (4-7 kg), similar to an average house cat.

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Its fossilized remains were dug up over the past decade near a dam in Patagonia in Rio Negro province's La Buitrera paleontological zone. The scientists described Jakapil in a study published in the journal Scientific Reports (https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-022-15535-6.pdf.)

The scientists said Jakapil marks a first-of-its-kind discovery of an armored dinosaur from the Cretaceous in South America. It is part of the thyreophoran dinosaur group that includes the likes of Stegosaurus, known for its bony back plates and spiky tail, and tank-like Ankylosaurus, covered in armor and wielding a club-like tail.

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Lead paleontologist Sebastian Apesteguia and his colleagues found a partial skeleton of Jakapil along with 15 tooth fragments featuring a leaf-like shape, similar to iguana teeth.

Jakapil resembles a primitive form of thyreophoran that lived much earlier, making it a surprise that it dated from the Cretaceous. Apesteguia said never before has such a thyreophoran been dug up anywhere in the southern hemisphere. 

(Reporting by Miguel Lo Bianco; Writing by David Alire Garcia; Editing by Will Dunham for Reuters)

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