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Home > Smart Living> Environment > How scientists studied climate change at the end of the world

How scientists studied climate change at the end of the world

During a recent expedition on an oceanographic research vessel, Chilean scientists studied harmful organisms and their impact on climate change in one of the most remote places on Earth – the Magallanes region

Scientist Maximo Frangopulos (right), researcher at the University of Magallanes (UMAG), collects phytoplankton samples from a net in the Magallanes region, Chile, on 3 December.
Scientist Maximo Frangopulos (right), researcher at the University of Magallanes (UMAG), collects phytoplankton samples from a net in the Magallanes region, Chile, on 3 December. (AFP)
A view of the Fouque glacier in southern Chile's region of Magallanes. Scientists believe the conditions found in the water here will appear in other parts of the world in the coming decades, as the impact of climate change mounts.
A view of the Fouque glacier in southern Chile's region of Magallanes. Scientists believe the conditions found in the water here will appear in other parts of the world in the coming decades, as the impact of climate change mounts. (AFP)
Marine biologist Emilio Alarcon (right) takes water collected by water sampling devices from the sea in the Magallanes region. The scientific mission paid special attention to the ‘red tides’ -- harmful algal blooms that can turn the sea red.
Marine biologist Emilio Alarcon (right) takes water collected by water sampling devices from the sea in the Magallanes region. The scientific mission paid special attention to the ‘red tides’ -- harmful algal blooms that can turn the sea red. (AFP)
Alarcon (left) uses a syringe to collect water from a water sampling device from the sea. The algal blooms were first recorded in the Magallanes region half a century ago and have since been responsible for the deaths of 23 people and poisoned more than 200.
Alarcon (left) uses a syringe to collect water from a water sampling device from the sea. The algal blooms were first recorded in the Magallanes region half a century ago and have since been responsible for the deaths of 23 people and poisoned more than 200. (AFP)
Frangopulos (center), researcher at the University of Magallanes (UMAG), and crew members of the Chilean navy scientific research ship Cabo de Hornos, carry a net that collected phytoplankton samples.
Frangopulos (center), researcher at the University of Magallanes (UMAG), and crew members of the Chilean navy scientific research ship Cabo de Hornos, carry a net that collected phytoplankton samples. (AFP)
The oceanographic research vessel Cabo de Hornos is seen in the Magallanes region, Chile, on 3 December. The expedition stopped at 14 places, each time taking water samples at different levels up to a depth of 200 meters. The scientists also combed the shores for algae and molluscs.
The oceanographic research vessel Cabo de Hornos is seen in the Magallanes region, Chile, on 3 December. The expedition stopped at 14 places, each time taking water samples at different levels up to a depth of 200 meters. The scientists also combed the shores for algae and molluscs. (AFP)

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