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Home > Smart Living> Environment > Can science and art save dying coral reefs?

Can science and art save dying coral reefs?

Founded by a marine biologist and musician, Coral Morphologic uses underwater media – images, audio and time-lapsed video – to raise awareness about dying coral reefs

A variety of fluorescent and fleshy solitary stony corals are on display at the Coral Morphologic lab in Miami. The company raises awareness about dying coral reefs, presenting the issue through science and art: including livestreams of coral set to music, video images projected on buildings etc.
A variety of fluorescent and fleshy solitary stony corals are on display at the Coral Morphologic lab in Miami. The company raises awareness about dying coral reefs, presenting the issue through science and art: including livestreams of coral set to music, video images projected on buildings etc. (AP)
Marine biologist Colin Foord, (towards the back), and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab in Miami.
Marine biologist Colin Foord, (towards the back), and musician J.D. McKay work at their Coral Morphologic lab in Miami. (AP)
McKay (left) and Foord, at their Coral Morphologic lab in Miami. They founded the company in 2007. According to their website, Coral Morphologic’s artwork is informed by a scientific mission to document, aquaculture, and protect Miami’s (and the world’s) coral.
McKay (left) and Foord, at their Coral Morphologic lab in Miami. They founded the company in 2007. According to their website, Coral Morphologic’s artwork is informed by a scientific mission to document, aquaculture, and protect Miami’s (and the world’s) coral. (AP)
Foord uses a toothbrush to clean the glass on the Coral City Camera along a rock wall, at PortMiami in Miami. According to AP, one of their most popular projects is the Coral City Camera, which recently passed 2 million views and usually has about 100 viewers online at any given time each day.
Foord uses a toothbrush to clean the glass on the Coral City Camera along a rock wall, at PortMiami in Miami. According to AP, one of their most popular projects is the Coral City Camera, which recently passed 2 million views and usually has about 100 viewers online at any given time each day. (AP)
Staghorn coral clings to rocks near the Coral City Camera, that livestreams images from along a rock wall in Miami. The AP report adds: warming oceans prompt coral bleaching, raising the risk of infectious diseases that can cause mass coral die-offs, as per the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
Staghorn coral clings to rocks near the Coral City Camera, that livestreams images from along a rock wall in Miami. The AP report adds: warming oceans prompt coral bleaching, raising the risk of infectious diseases that can cause mass coral die-offs, as per the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (AP)
Zoanthus coral, nicknamed Miami Vice for the blue and pink colors, are part of an aquaculture project at the Coral Morphologic lab. 
Zoanthus coral, nicknamed Miami Vice for the blue and pink colors, are part of an aquaculture project at the Coral Morphologic lab.  (AP)
A view of corals in tanks at the Florida Coral Rescue Center. The World Meteorological Organization recent said that even one year at 1.5C of warming can have dire impacts, such as killing many of the world's coral reefs and shrinking Arctic sea ice cover.
A view of corals in tanks at the Florida Coral Rescue Center. The World Meteorological Organization recent said that even one year at 1.5C of warming can have dire impacts, such as killing many of the world's coral reefs and shrinking Arctic sea ice cover. (Via REUTERS)

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