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Home > Smart Living> Environment > As glaciers melt, climate heritage and ecosystems face risk

As glaciers melt, climate heritage and ecosystems face risk

Countries, communities around the world have relied on glaciers for everything from hydroelectricity to tourism. But the ice sheets are now melting rapidly due to climate change

Icebergs float in a fjord after calving off from glaciers on the Greenland ice sheet on Aug. 3, 2017. The Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been melting and its glaciers retreating at an accelerated pace due to warmer temperatures.
Icebergs float in a fjord after calving off from glaciers on the Greenland ice sheet on Aug. 3, 2017. The Greenland ice sheet, the second largest body of ice in the world which covers roughly 80 percent of the country, has been melting and its glaciers retreating at an accelerated pace due to warmer temperatures. (AP)
This combination of satellite images provided by Planet Labs Inc. shows glaciers at Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2016, left and 2021. According to an AP report, with many glaciers rapidly melting because of climate change, countries around the world are facing trouble from the disappearance of the ice sheets.
This combination of satellite images provided by Planet Labs Inc. shows glaciers at Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania in 2016, left and 2021. According to an AP report, with many glaciers rapidly melting because of climate change, countries around the world are facing trouble from the disappearance of the ice sheets. (AP)
Residents walk in the Urus del Lago Poopo indigenous community, which sits along the salt-crusted former shoreline of Lake Poopo, in Punaca, Bolivia, on May 24, 2021. Bolivia's second-largest lake dried up about five years ago, victim of shrinking glaciers, water diversions for farming and contamination.
Residents walk in the Urus del Lago Poopo indigenous community, which sits along the salt-crusted former shoreline of Lake Poopo, in Punaca, Bolivia, on May 24, 2021. Bolivia's second-largest lake dried up about five years ago, victim of shrinking glaciers, water diversions for farming and contamination. (AP)
This file photograph taken on October 27, 2021 near Gletsch shows the Rhone Glacier and its glacial lake, formed by the melting of the glacier due to global warming. Swiss glaciers lost 1% of their volume in 2021, despite heavy snow and a cool summer, due to climate change. 
This file photograph taken on October 27, 2021 near Gletsch shows the Rhone Glacier and its glacial lake, formed by the melting of the glacier due to global warming. Swiss glaciers lost 1% of their volume in 2021, despite heavy snow and a cool summer, due to climate change.  (AFP)
Glaciologist Andrea Fischer explores a natural glacier cavity of the Jamtalferner glacier near Galtuer, Austria, on October 15, 2021. Giant ice caves have appeared in glaciers accelerating the melting process faster than expected as warmer air rushes through the ice mass until it collapses.
Glaciologist Andrea Fischer explores a natural glacier cavity of the Jamtalferner glacier near Galtuer, Austria, on October 15, 2021. Giant ice caves have appeared in glaciers accelerating the melting process faster than expected as warmer air rushes through the ice mass until it collapses. (REUTERS)
In this file photo from 2012, a herd of elephants walks as Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, sits topped with snow in the background, seen from Amboseli National Park in southern Kenya. Africa's rare glaciers will disappear in the next two decades because of climate change.
In this file photo from 2012, a herd of elephants walks as Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, sits topped with snow in the background, seen from Amboseli National Park in southern Kenya. Africa's rare glaciers will disappear in the next two decades because of climate change. (AP)

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