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Home > Photos > Photos: Highlights from day one of Lotus Make-up India Fashion Week

Photos: Highlights from day one of Lotus Make-up India Fashion Week

From Rajesh Pratap Singh to Namrata Joshipura, Lounge picks the best of the shows from day one, when ace designers reinvent style for the covid-19 world

Rajesh Pratap Singh's collection 'Fall.ing' is a contemporary take on his classic styles, with a mix of modern separates and traditional staples such as blouses, tunics, jackets, dhoti pants, shift dresses, angrakha and kediya jackets and lehengas.
Rajesh Pratap Singh's collection 'Fall.ing' is a contemporary take on his classic styles, with a mix of modern separates and traditional staples such as blouses, tunics, jackets, dhoti pants, shift dresses, angrakha and kediya jackets and lehengas.
The treatment ranged from bright stripes to crisp, abstract and asymmetric whites and bright pastel hues. These are accented with hand block-printed techniques and pintucks, which look simple from afar but are intricately detailed up close.
The treatment ranged from bright stripes to crisp, abstract and asymmetric whites and bright pastel hues. These are accented with hand block-printed techniques and pintucks, which look simple from afar but are intricately detailed up close.
Vaishali Shadangule sculpted flora, foliage and natural landscapes from fabric as well as fungi-like creations, all on conceptual separates, such as blouses, skirts, trousers, and dresses.
Vaishali Shadangule sculpted flora, foliage and natural landscapes from fabric as well as fungi-like creations, all on conceptual separates, such as blouses, skirts, trousers, and dresses.
She also crafted her signature cord technique and abstract, asymmetric silhouettes.
She also crafted her signature cord technique and abstract, asymmetric silhouettes.

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Dhi's silhouettes were relaxed and comfortable, rendered as billowing dresses with slight embroideries, pleated waistlines, shift dresses with mandarin collars, tunics with asymmetric hemlines and jumpsuits and dress-sleeves with smocking. The attention to tailoring was sharp, crisp and clean.
Dhi's silhouettes were relaxed and comfortable, rendered as billowing dresses with slight embroideries, pleated waistlines, shift dresses with mandarin collars, tunics with asymmetric hemlines and jumpsuits and dress-sleeves with smocking. The attention to tailoring was sharp, crisp and clean.
Fabrics such as organic cottons and handspun khadi made the clothes simple and wearable at home, while being minimalist.
Fabrics such as organic cottons and handspun khadi made the clothes simple and wearable at home, while being minimalist.
In Nitin Bal Chauhan's collection, models with dramatic make-up and accessories were dressed in exaggerated versions of the British Army’s uniform — red jackets with puffed sleeves, Victorian collars and cuffs and Chauhan’s signature 3D embroidery, reminiscent of bullet belts, all subtle colonial references combined with military-inspired detailing.
In Nitin Bal Chauhan's collection, models with dramatic make-up and accessories were dressed in exaggerated versions of the British Army’s uniform — red jackets with puffed sleeves, Victorian collars and cuffs and Chauhan’s signature 3D embroidery, reminiscent of bullet belts, all subtle colonial references combined with military-inspired detailing.
The uniforms turn into jackets and trouser sets with soft tones of nude featuring artworks of screaming, glaring and deathly faces, done by the designer, a reminder of all the lives lost.
The uniforms turn into jackets and trouser sets with soft tones of nude featuring artworks of screaming, glaring and deathly faces, done by the designer, a reminder of all the lives lost.

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Payal Jain's collection of dresses were crafted from blends of cotton and silk chanderi, organza and munga, and are accented with textiles with traditional techniques of jacquard, such as katrauan and kadua, or woven in silk yarns, which float into sheer, diaphanous silhouettes that float fluidly.
Payal Jain's collection of dresses were crafted from blends of cotton and silk chanderi, organza and munga, and are accented with textiles with traditional techniques of jacquard, such as katrauan and kadua, or woven in silk yarns, which float into sheer, diaphanous silhouettes that float fluidly.
The colour palette is inspired by traditional Buddhist thangka paintings, in bold hues of vermillion, lapis, emerald sulphur yellow, and is rendered in blob-like paint strokes.
The colour palette is inspired by traditional Buddhist thangka paintings, in bold hues of vermillion, lapis, emerald sulphur yellow, and is rendered in blob-like paint strokes.
Borrowing contemporary silhouettes, Joshipura added her signature style of elevating them with stunning embellishments and accents. The first look itself, a cape jacket, seemed as though it was floating with feathered plumes.
Borrowing contemporary silhouettes, Joshipura added her signature style of elevating them with stunning embellishments and accents. The first look itself, a cape jacket, seemed as though it was floating with feathered plumes.
The colour palette was a classic monochrome, along with pale blue denims and shiny metallics.
The colour palette was a classic monochrome, along with pale blue denims and shiny metallics.

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