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Home > News > Talking Point > Singhu border: A protest site turns into a village

Singhu border: A protest site turns into a village

Along the 35km stretch on NH 1, at the border between Haryana and Delhi, farmers have recreated a sense of their home as they sit in to demand the repeal of three farm laws. They've been here since 26 November, protesting against the laws that seem to privilege corporate interests over theirs.

Balbir Singh, a worker at a Delhi gurudwara, has been making 200kg of vegetables every day at the protest site as part of a 'langar'. At 12:30pm on Sunday, he was making 'gobhi aloo' for lunch. A beggar standing near this tent told me,
Balbir Singh, a worker at a Delhi gurudwara, has been making 200kg of vegetables every day at the protest site as part of a 'langar'. At 12:30pm on Sunday, he was making 'gobhi aloo' for lunch. A beggar standing near this tent told me, "I haven’t begged for a week. The 'langar' is keeping my family full.” (Pooja Singh)
Every 100m, you can see volunteers cutting vegetables and preparing food. This group of farmers from Jalandhar makes 800 packets of Maggi every afternoon for people at the site. Either friends or family members provide the supplies.
Every 100m, you can see volunteers cutting vegetables and preparing food. This group of farmers from Jalandhar makes 800 packets of Maggi every afternoon for people at the site. Either friends or family members provide the supplies. (Pooja Singh)
Besides food stalls, kiosks offering medicines are spread across the site. This group of volunteers from a hospital in Tarantal has been giving medicines free to people. The most common ailments?
Besides food stalls, kiosks offering medicines are spread across the site. This group of volunteers from a hospital in Tarantal has been giving medicines free to people. The most common ailments? "Cough and flu," said Ramandeep Singh (wearing brown turban). (Pooja Singh)
Along the 35km stretch, farmers have created porous borders, marking their individual community spaces.
Along the 35km stretch, farmers have created porous borders, marking their individual community spaces. "Sikhs don't smoke, so we maintain some distance," said Raghuveer, a farmer from Haryana, before taking a puff. (Pooja Singh)
Endless servings of tea are available throughout the day to keep the people warm during the winter.
Endless servings of tea are available throughout the day to keep the people warm during the winter. (HT )

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  • FIRST PUBLISHED
    07.12.2020 | 05:30 PM IST

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