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Home > How To Lounge> Art & Culture > Three Indian galleries put their best foot forward at Frieze London 

Three Indian galleries put their best foot forward at Frieze London 

Nature Morte, Jhaveri Contemporary and Vadehra Art Gallery present reflective works at one of the most influential contemporary art fairs 

After a brief hiatus last year, Frieze London is back with its latest edition in a physical format (on till 17 October). For Jhaveri Contemporary too, this is the first physical presentation at an art fair since the onset of the pandemic. The gallery is presenting works by Rana Begum, Lubna Chowdhary, Shezad Dawood along with rare historical paintings by Anwar Jalal Shemza, and more. Seen here is Shemza's 'Green Composition', (1965), oil on canvas on hardboard, 
After a brief hiatus last year, Frieze London is back with its latest edition in a physical format (on till 17 October). For Jhaveri Contemporary too, this is the first physical presentation at an art fair since the onset of the pandemic. The gallery is presenting works by Rana Begum, Lubna Chowdhary, Shezad Dawood along with rare historical paintings by Anwar Jalal Shemza, and more. Seen here is Shemza's 'Green Composition', (1965), oil on canvas on hardboard, 
While spray painting is conventionally associated with street art and graffiti, it has served to inform art practices, across genres, as well. Rana Begum, for one, has used this to create monumental spray painted canvases and art installations. Jhaveri Contemporary is showing Rana Begum's 'No.1078 Painting', (2021), paint on canvas, at the fair
While spray painting is conventionally associated with street art and graffiti, it has served to inform art practices, across genres, as well. Rana Begum, for one, has used this to create monumental spray painted canvases and art installations. Jhaveri Contemporary is showing Rana Begum's 'No.1078 Painting', (2021), paint on canvas, at the fair
Lubna Chowdhary constructs a utopian landscape with 28 unglazed and handcrafted ceramic elements. “Chowdhary opens up the language of geometry to the aesthetics of the modern city, to natural and industrial landscapes, echoing the plurality of our built environment and, with it, the indeterminable logic and pulse of city life. In creating the works, there is a pleasure in materials and the skill of manual production,” mentions the note by Jhaveri Contemporary. (above) Lubna Chowdhary's 'Marker 5', (2021), ceramic painting.
Lubna Chowdhary constructs a utopian landscape with 28 unglazed and handcrafted ceramic elements. “Chowdhary opens up the language of geometry to the aesthetics of the modern city, to natural and industrial landscapes, echoing the plurality of our built environment and, with it, the indeterminable logic and pulse of city life. In creating the works, there is a pleasure in materials and the skill of manual production,” mentions the note by Jhaveri Contemporary. (above) Lubna Chowdhary's 'Marker 5', (2021), ceramic painting.
Just like Lubna Chowdhary, London-born artist Shezad Dawood too looks at architectural landscapes, though his line of thought is very different. He interrogates intersections of cross-cultural influences and “other modernities”. Dawood looks at how architecture in south Asia fused Western modernism with local philosophies. “His recent works explore the legacy of the architect Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and his incomplete housing project for workers at Joypurhat, Bangladesh,” states the note by Jhaveri Contemporary.
Just like Lubna Chowdhary, London-born artist Shezad Dawood too looks at architectural landscapes, though his line of thought is very different. He interrogates intersections of cross-cultural influences and “other modernities”. Dawood looks at how architecture in south Asia fused Western modernism with local philosophies. “His recent works explore the legacy of the architect Muzharul Islam (1923-2012) and his incomplete housing project for workers at Joypurhat, Bangladesh,” states the note by Jhaveri Contemporary.
Vadehra Art Gallery, Delhi, is participating in the Frieze fair with two booths at Frieze Masters and Frieze London. In the former, as part of the curated section Spotlight, the gallery is presenting a rare body of early drawings, etchings and canvases from the 1960s and 1970s by celebrated Indian modernist A Ramachandran in a selection titled ‘A Victorious Storm’. (above) a canvas by the artist.
Vadehra Art Gallery, Delhi, is participating in the Frieze fair with two booths at Frieze Masters and Frieze London. In the former, as part of the curated section Spotlight, the gallery is presenting a rare body of early drawings, etchings and canvases from the 1960s and 1970s by celebrated Indian modernist A Ramachandran in a selection titled ‘A Victorious Storm’. (above) a canvas by the artist.
According to Roshini Vadehra, director, Vadehra Art Gallery, these early works by A Ramachandran are a powerful depiction of the angst that he observed of urban life during the 1960s-70s. While his drawings seem like the exploration of the power of the line, his canvases overwhelm with the rawness and intensity of colour and form. “The etchings, on the other hand, are an interesting exploration and interpretation of themes in Christianity, while also extending from the melancholic and angst ridden encounters with the perceived world,” she says. Seen here is an etching by the artist
According to Roshini Vadehra, director, Vadehra Art Gallery, these early works by A Ramachandran are a powerful depiction of the angst that he observed of urban life during the 1960s-70s. While his drawings seem like the exploration of the power of the line, his canvases overwhelm with the rawness and intensity of colour and form. “The etchings, on the other hand, are an interesting exploration and interpretation of themes in Christianity, while also extending from the melancholic and angst ridden encounters with the perceived world,” she says. Seen here is an etching by the artist
The gallery is also presenting works by contemporary artists at Frieze London this year, in an exhibition titled ‘A Brief Current’. It includes works by B.V. Doshi (above), Rameshwar Broota and Atul Dodiya, photographs by Sunil Gupta, photographic installations by Shilpa Gupta as well as mixed media works by Anju Dodiya. This is the first participation by the gallery at Frieze London.
The gallery is also presenting works by contemporary artists at Frieze London this year, in an exhibition titled ‘A Brief Current’. It includes works by B.V. Doshi (above), Rameshwar Broota and Atul Dodiya, photographs by Sunil Gupta, photographic installations by Shilpa Gupta as well as mixed media works by Anju Dodiya. This is the first participation by the gallery at Frieze London.
For Roshini Vadehra, the common thread that binds the works together is the search for meaning, identity and expression in the complex cultural fabric that we find ourselves in. Seen here is Atul Dodiya's ‘The Reader’.
For Roshini Vadehra, the common thread that binds the works together is the search for meaning, identity and expression in the complex cultural fabric that we find ourselves in. Seen here is Atul Dodiya's ‘The Reader’.
“We see the nostalgia of memories in a dreamlike architectural drawing on canvas by BV Doshi, the revisit to a landscape of complex childhood experimentations by Sunil Gupta, the search for self in abstraction by Rameshwar Broota’s sculptural painting, the painterly freedom of isolated figure in nature by Atul Dodiya, the juxtaposition and play of the performative and the soul searching in Anju Dodiya’s mixed media installation…” she says. (above) Sunil Gupta's ‘Cruising 1960s Delhi’
“We see the nostalgia of memories in a dreamlike architectural drawing on canvas by BV Doshi, the revisit to a landscape of complex childhood experimentations by Sunil Gupta, the search for self in abstraction by Rameshwar Broota’s sculptural painting, the painterly freedom of isolated figure in nature by Atul Dodiya, the juxtaposition and play of the performative and the soul searching in Anju Dodiya’s mixed media installation…” she says. (above) Sunil Gupta's ‘Cruising 1960s Delhi’
Nature Morte too is presenting an exhibition of work by three artists—Jitish Kallat, Imran Qureshi and Tanya Goel—at Frieze London. Especially interesting is Jitish Kallat’s new photographic lenticular series, ‘Epicycles’ (above), which follows a trail of free-associative intuitions beginning with seemingly incidental changes occurring within his studio premises.
Nature Morte too is presenting an exhibition of work by three artists—Jitish Kallat, Imran Qureshi and Tanya Goel—at Frieze London. Especially interesting is Jitish Kallat’s new photographic lenticular series, ‘Epicycles’ (above), which follows a trail of free-associative intuitions beginning with seemingly incidental changes occurring within his studio premises.

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  • FIRST PUBLISHED
    14.10.2021 | 12:30 PM IST

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