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Celebrating sustainability through India's textile history

An ongoing digital exhibition, 'Karkhana Chronicles II', explores the country's heritage in collaboration with royal families of Indore, Kathiwada, Bhavnagar and Mysuru

The show includes a series of installations that bring together craft patronage and contemporary design.
The show includes a series of installations that bring together craft patronage and contemporary design. (Courtesy Karkhana Chronicles II )
Brought to life by designer Adaa Mallikk, this installation is from Bhavnagar. 'Bharat kaam' embroidery work can be seen as sleeve border detailing. Leaf detailing embroidery on sheer organza has been pieced and draped on the kathiyawadi sari, draped around the waist. Chains of red beaded metal form an overlay structure extending over the shoulder.
Brought to life by designer Adaa Mallikk, this installation is from Bhavnagar. 'Bharat kaam' embroidery work can be seen as sleeve border detailing. Leaf detailing embroidery on sheer organza has been pieced and draped on the kathiyawadi sari, draped around the waist. Chains of red beaded metal form an overlay structure extending over the shoulder. (Courtesy Karkhana Chronicles)
Weavers in Madhya Pradesh's Indore created this Maheshwari sari using the age-old 'garbh reshmi' composition, which marries silk and cotton with a simple zari 'bugdi' border. The 'nazneen' Varanasi silk brocade blouse was designed by Raw Mango's Sanjay Garg.
Weavers in Madhya Pradesh's Indore created this Maheshwari sari using the age-old 'garbh reshmi' composition, which marries silk and cotton with a simple zari 'bugdi' border. The 'nazneen' Varanasi silk brocade blouse was designed by Raw Mango's Sanjay Garg. (Courtesy Karkhana Chronicles)
Created under the guidance of Madhya Pradesh's royal Kathiwada family, this installation combines several traditional design techniques. A 'kasota' weave (a languishing craft) piece, traditionally used as loin cloth by tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat, is tied around the waist. The bead jewellery exhibits the talent of women from Madhya Pradesh's tribal communities. The jacket is made using bamboo. A hand-block print garment piece, also known as 'bagh' print, adorns the waist at the right side of the installation.
Created under the guidance of Madhya Pradesh's royal Kathiwada family, this installation combines several traditional design techniques. A 'kasota' weave (a languishing craft) piece, traditionally used as loin cloth by tribal communities in Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat, is tied around the waist. The bead jewellery exhibits the talent of women from Madhya Pradesh's tribal communities. The jacket is made using bamboo. A hand-block print garment piece, also known as 'bagh' print, adorns the waist at the right side of the installation. (Courtesy Karkhana Chronicles)
Brought to life by Mysore royal family's Yaduveer Wadiyar and his sister, Jayathmika Lakshmi, this installation has a Mysore Silk Saree paired with a utilitarian yet classy khadi jacket. It is placed on a 'Navalgund Durrie', a dying craft native to Dharwad, Karnataka.
Brought to life by Mysore royal family's Yaduveer Wadiyar and his sister, Jayathmika Lakshmi, this installation has a Mysore Silk Saree paired with a utilitarian yet classy khadi jacket. It is placed on a 'Navalgund Durrie', a dying craft native to Dharwad, Karnataka. (Courtesy Karkhana Chronicles)

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  • FIRST PUBLISHED
    27.04.2021 | 01:00 PM IST

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