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Home > Fashion> Trends > Armani gives up angora wool as part of fur-free policy

Armani gives up angora wool as part of fur-free policy

The company has said it would no longer use the material across all of its lines from next year's fall-winter collection

Models present creations by Italian designer Giorgio Armani during One Night Only series in Dubai on 26 October. (AFP)

Italian fashion house Armani announced Wednesday it would no longer use angora wool, a product made from rabbit hair, as part of its fur-free policy.

The company said it would no longer use the material across all of its lines from next year's fall-winter collection.

Also read: Valentino joins the fur-free club

At Armani "the percentage of clothing items containing angora wool is very low and we plan to replace it with materials that meet higher criteria in terms of animal well-being," a group spokeswoman told AFP.

Soft and silky angora wool is a fibre made from the coats of angora rabbits.

The animal rights group Peta called in 2013 for a halt to the use of angora wool, releasing a video of an angora rabbit wailing as its fur was pulled out to be collected.

Armani renounced using fur in its products in 2016, saying there are now practical alternatives "that render the use of cruel practices unnecessary".

A growing number of fashion companies are adopting policies against using materials that require cruelty towards animals.

Three months ago, Saint Laurent owner Kering had said that all its brands were going fur-free. Starting from the Fall 2022 collections, none of its brands will be using fur, the French company had said.

“The world has changed, along with our clients, and luxury naturally needs to adapt to that,” chief executive officer Francois-Henri Pinault had said in the statement.

According to a Bloomberg report, the group’s biggest brand Gucci took the lead in 2017 and was followed by Balenciaga, Bottega Veneta and Alexander McQueen. Brioni and Saint Laurent still use fur but will stop after the spring collections, a representative for the company said.

Kering’s decision stood in contrast to luxury group competitor LVMH. “Our stance is freedom of choice, for our customers and our brands,” LVMH group managing director Antonio Belloni had said in April. LVMH’s Fendi sells mink fur coats for $30,000.

Also read: Israel becomes first nation to ban fur sale in fashion trade

 

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