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Source: A compendium of rose-gold hues to glam up your Valentine’s Day

From designer wear to crystal embedded pen, check out this week's covet list

This rose gold sequin pleated midi skirt will uplift both your mood and sartorial quotient. The lined skirt has a high-rise waist with a hidden back zipper and clasp. Available at Lulus.com; $49 (around  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>3,500)
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This rose gold sequin pleated midi skirt will uplift both your mood and sartorial quotient. The lined skirt has a high-rise waist with a hidden back zipper and clasp. Available at Lulus.com; $49 (around 3,500) (Lulus.com)
The versatile Rhinestone embellished pointed toe four-inch heel will go with both day and evening wear. It comes in nude and silver colours. Available at Deblossomcollection.com; $59.99
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The versatile Rhinestone embellished pointed toe four-inch heel will go with both day and evening wear. It comes in nude and silver colours. Available at Deblossomcollection.com; $59.99 (Deblossomcollection.com)
What better gift to mark your love with than this floral 27 diamond-studded rose gold ring. Lined with 14 tourmaline gemstones on 18 carat rose gold, it will invite both attention and admiration. Available at Tanishq.co.in;  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>73,259
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What better gift to mark your love with than this floral 27 diamond-studded rose gold ring. Lined with 14 tourmaline gemstones on 18 carat rose gold, it will invite both attention and admiration. Available at Tanishq.co.in; 73,259 (Tanishq.co.in)
From Comino Couture London, this full-sleeved rose gold skater dress with the pop of embroidered rose in the centre will add glamour to your Valentine date. Available at Cominocouturelondon.com;  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>12,700
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From Comino Couture London, this full-sleeved rose gold skater dress with the pop of embroidered rose in the centre will add glamour to your Valentine date. Available at Cominocouturelondon.com; 12,700 (Cominocouturelondon.com)
There are watches, and then there is Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso. With its dual dials and iconic tank watch case in rose gold, this one makes for a classic dress watch. Bruce Wayne certainly thinks so, he wore it in The Dark Knight Rises. Available at Ethoswatches.com;  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>19 lakh
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There are watches, and then there is Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso. With its dual dials and iconic tank watch case in rose gold, this one makes for a classic dress watch. Bruce Wayne certainly thinks so, he wore it in The Dark Knight Rises. Available at Ethoswatches.com; 19 lakh (Ethoswatches.com)
Wired Stool Give your room a modernist yet regal touch with this leather-padded iron stool in a deep rose-gold colour. It’s lightweight, and can be moved easily. Available at Bubblewrapstore. com;  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>8,500
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Wired Stool Give your room a modernist yet regal touch with this leather-padded iron stool in a deep rose-gold colour. It’s lightweight, and can be moved easily. Available at Bubblewrapstore. com; 8,500 (Bubblewrapstore. com)
Write with panache with this rose-gold tone plated crystalline swan ballpoint pen embedded with Swarovski crystals. The pen, with a Pointiage-embellished swan charm, comes in its own pouch. Available at Swarovski.com;  <span class='webrupee'>₹</span>4,690
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Write with panache with this rose-gold tone plated crystalline swan ballpoint pen embedded with Swarovski crystals. The pen, with a Pointiage-embellished swan charm, comes in its own pouch. Available at Swarovski.com; 4,690 (Swarovski.com)

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19 works that you simply must see at the India Art Fair 2023

Nearly 85 exhibitors are presenting from South Asia at the 2023 edition of this annual cultural event. Lounge helps you navigate this art maze with a list of eclectic works

Politics of the everyday: The film, ‘Pipio: A Bird Flies, A Stone is Thrown’, questions the role of the witness in instances of crimes of violence. Presented by the Gujral Foundation, the film was created by Payal Arya and Aditi Kulkarni during their visit to the FilmAkademie Baden Wurttemberg GmbH, Germany, between 2019 and 2020. “The film dwells on the negotiation between the witness, victim, and perpetrator…,” states the curatorial note. (Seen here: Video stills from the film ‘Pipio’. Image Courtesy- © Aditi Kulkarni & Payal Arya) 
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Politics of the everyday: The film, ‘Pipio: A Bird Flies, A Stone is Thrown’, questions the role of the witness in instances of crimes of violence. Presented by the Gujral Foundation, the film was created by Payal Arya and Aditi Kulkarni during their visit to the FilmAkademie Baden Wurttemberg GmbH, Germany, between 2019 and 2020. “The film dwells on the negotiation between the witness, victim, and perpetrator…,” states the curatorial note. (Seen here: Video stills from the film ‘Pipio’. Image Courtesy- © Aditi Kulkarni & Payal Arya) 
Imagined worlds: The Kiran Nadar Museum of Art is showcasing a work by Raqib Shaw, which has not been shown in the public sphere so far. True to the artist’s signature style, this work too draws on iconography from the East and the West. It stands out for its comment on the violence that has spread through the world today, destroying the beauty of cultures and places in its wake
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Imagined worlds: The Kiran Nadar Museum of Art is showcasing a work by Raqib Shaw, which has not been shown in the public sphere so far. True to the artist’s signature style, this work too draws on iconography from the East and the West. It stands out for its comment on the violence that has spread through the world today, destroying the beauty of cultures and places in its wake
Metaphysical ideas in metal: Interior designer Vikram Goyal has unveiled a new series of sculptural pieces at the fair, taking his engagement with materiality and craftsmanship to the next level. Especially interesting is ‘The Tree of Good Fortune’ set of sculptures, which draws from the Brutalist style. “Each limb is made with multiple, unpolished parts in brass, the studio’s signature material, welded together with exposed edges and a patinated gold surface,” states the artist note. 
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Metaphysical ideas in metal: Interior designer Vikram Goyal has unveiled a new series of sculptural pieces at the fair, taking his engagement with materiality and craftsmanship to the next level. Especially interesting is ‘The Tree of Good Fortune’ set of sculptures, which draws from the Brutalist style. “Each limb is made with multiple, unpolished parts in brass, the studio’s signature material, welded together with exposed edges and a patinated gold surface,” states the artist note. 
Stitching personal narratives: Shrine Empire is presenting a series of thread works by Renuka Rajiv. The artist, in works such as Virus Body and Blood Tradition, brings together their childhood interest in fabric and the handmade. Using techniques like tie-dye and embroidery, and materials such as old garments of family and friends, Rajiv’s works have always been deeply autobiographical—often being a comment on gender, sexuality, and relationships.
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Stitching personal narratives: Shrine Empire is presenting a series of thread works by Renuka Rajiv. The artist, in works such as Virus Body and Blood Tradition, brings together their childhood interest in fabric and the handmade. Using techniques like tie-dye and embroidery, and materials such as old garments of family and friends, Rajiv’s works have always been deeply autobiographical—often being a comment on gender, sexuality, and relationships.
Capturing paradoxes: One gets to observe two facets of artist Shivani Aggarwal’s practice as part of an outdoor project as well as the showcase by Studio Art at the fair. Her massive steel-finished fibreglass sculpture, How do I Measure The Scale, placed outside, aptly looks at the paradoxical attempts at measuring the intangible. At the Studio Art booth, you can see a set of five wooden newspapers, as part of Lost Stories—Time and Transformation, which look at the transient nature of news, the idea of preserved time and attempts at small radical changes by the common citizens.
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Capturing paradoxes: One gets to observe two facets of artist Shivani Aggarwal’s practice as part of an outdoor project as well as the showcase by Studio Art at the fair. Her massive steel-finished fibreglass sculpture, How do I Measure The Scale, placed outside, aptly looks at the paradoxical attempts at measuring the intangible. At the Studio Art booth, you can see a set of five wooden newspapers, as part of Lost Stories—Time and Transformation, which look at the transient nature of news, the idea of preserved time and attempts at small radical changes by the common citizens.
Feminism in gold-and-white: A childhood memory of her ammamma, or grandmother, in a kasavu mundu veshti has informed artist Lakshmi Madhavan’s practice. The smell and fabric of the kasavu textile, now a dying art practised only in Balarampuram, Kerala, has stayed with her. “The kasavu mundu veshti comes with highly coded designs and ways of wearing, depending on its wearer’s gender, class and caste,” states the artist note. Madhavan, who is the artist-in-residence at the fair, has created a series of gold-and-white panels, Hanging by a Thread, with the words ‘some/body’, ‘every/body’, ‘no/body’, woven into the border to highlight the fact that the very weavers who create the textile are not allowed to wear it. The panels are being presented by the Devi Art Foundation. 
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Feminism in gold-and-white: A childhood memory of her ammamma, or grandmother, in a kasavu mundu veshti has informed artist Lakshmi Madhavan’s practice. The smell and fabric of the kasavu textile, now a dying art practised only in Balarampuram, Kerala, has stayed with her. “The kasavu mundu veshti comes with highly coded designs and ways of wearing, depending on its wearer’s gender, class and caste,” states the artist note. Madhavan, who is the artist-in-residence at the fair, has created a series of gold-and-white panels, Hanging by a Thread, with the words ‘some/body’, ‘every/body’, ‘no/body’, woven into the border to highlight the fact that the very weavers who create the textile are not allowed to wear it. The panels are being presented by the Devi Art Foundation. 
Transcending boundaries: Mrinalini Mukherjee is known for defying categorisation—through her career she sculpted unusual anthropomorphic forms in fibre, which defied scale, and were erotic, sensual and unsettling at the same time. Now, one can see a different facet of her practice at the Jhaveri Contemporary booth, which is showcasing rare works in bronze by the artist along with a pair of watercolours. The set of reflective landscapes feature muted colours—in her signature style—and inky tones. 
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Transcending boundaries: Mrinalini Mukherjee is known for defying categorisation—through her career she sculpted unusual anthropomorphic forms in fibre, which defied scale, and were erotic, sensual and unsettling at the same time. Now, one can see a different facet of her practice at the Jhaveri Contemporary booth, which is showcasing rare works in bronze by the artist along with a pair of watercolours. The set of reflective landscapes feature muted colours—in her signature style—and inky tones. 
A vibrant showcase: Galleria Continua, which has spaces in San Gimignano, Paris, Beijing, Dubai, and more, has an eclectic presentation at the fair, featuring works by Ai Weiwei, Kiki Smith and Nikhil Chopra. German-born, American artist Smith, who is known for her figural work themed around regeneration, sex and the natural world, is showing her acclaimed work, Shadow, which features celestial motifs. Then there is Osvaldo González’s Camino, which makes use of LED lights, and showcases the artist’s fascination with space. 
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A vibrant showcase: Galleria Continua, which has spaces in San Gimignano, Paris, Beijing, Dubai, and more, has an eclectic presentation at the fair, featuring works by Ai Weiwei, Kiki Smith and Nikhil Chopra. German-born, American artist Smith, who is known for her figural work themed around regeneration, sex and the natural world, is showing her acclaimed work, Shadow, which features celestial motifs. Then there is Osvaldo González’s Camino, which makes use of LED lights, and showcases the artist’s fascination with space. 
A pioneering practice: New York-based Aicon Contemporary is showing a poignant series of works, Allah (an acrylic on canvas) and an untitled painted wood piece by Rasheed Araeen, a Pakistan-born, London-based artist, writer, activist and curator. According to the gallery, the artist is recognised as the pioneer of minimalist sculpture in Britain. “His work in performance, photography, painting and sculpture throughout the 1970s to 1990s challenged Eurocentrism within the British art establishment and his curation and writing championed the role of artists from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean,” states the note. Since the 1970s he has published his own art journals and authored several books, with Islam & Modernism being the latest, published in 2022. 
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A pioneering practice: New York-based Aicon Contemporary is showing a poignant series of works, Allah (an acrylic on canvas) and an untitled painted wood piece by Rasheed Araeen, a Pakistan-born, London-based artist, writer, activist and curator. According to the gallery, the artist is recognised as the pioneer of minimalist sculpture in Britain. “His work in performance, photography, painting and sculpture throughout the 1970s to 1990s challenged Eurocentrism within the British art establishment and his curation and writing championed the role of artists from Asia, Africa and the Caribbean,” states the note. Since the 1970s he has published his own art journals and authored several books, with Islam & Modernism being the latest, published in 2022. 
All the world’s a stage: Hyderabad-based Kalakriti Art Gallery is presenting a new body of work, titled ‘Masquerade: An Endless Drama’, by Avijit Dutta. He uses tempera to reflect on the theatricality of life, with different scripts and characters engaging with one another. “An unseen tug of war thrives- between creative liberty and concept notes, fact and fiction, love and false affection, class, and mass. Truth is lost in this whirlwind melee of pretence and projected reality,” states the curatorial note about the premise of this set of artworks. 
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All the world’s a stage: Hyderabad-based Kalakriti Art Gallery is presenting a new body of work, titled ‘Masquerade: An Endless Drama’, by Avijit Dutta. He uses tempera to reflect on the theatricality of life, with different scripts and characters engaging with one another. “An unseen tug of war thrives- between creative liberty and concept notes, fact and fiction, love and false affection, class, and mass. Truth is lost in this whirlwind melee of pretence and projected reality,” states the curatorial note about the premise of this set of artworks. 
Hybrid worlds: The Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art is showcasing a special artist project, ‘Alternate Evolutions’, by Shrimanti Saha. The artist creates vivid visual worlds out of paper cutouts and drawings. Unhindered by a frame or borders, these visuals spread across walls like an “organism”. “The installation assumes multiple (after)lives, having been conceived in the various studios and residency spaces that she has worked in,” states the curatorial note. Saha has also extended these cut-out drawings into her animations, in which she approaches the moving image with the temperament of a painter. 
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Hybrid worlds: The Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art is showcasing a special artist project, ‘Alternate Evolutions’, by Shrimanti Saha. The artist creates vivid visual worlds out of paper cutouts and drawings. Unhindered by a frame or borders, these visuals spread across walls like an “organism”. “The installation assumes multiple (after)lives, having been conceived in the various studios and residency spaces that she has worked in,” states the curatorial note. Saha has also extended these cut-out drawings into her animations, in which she approaches the moving image with the temperament of a painter. 
The body as a site of art: Experimenter has brought extremely thought-provoking works to the fair by artists like Sohrab Hura, Adip Dutta, Biraaj Dodiya, Julien Segard, Kallol Datta, Kanishka Raja, Praneet Soi, Sahil Naik, and more. Make sure to view the work, Self Portrait at Dawn, by Bhasha Chakrabarti, who is deeply interested in exploring the world through the body and the skin as a medium. Her ongoing show at Experimenter-Ballygunge Place, curated by Shaunak Mahbubani, reflects on this aspect of her practice, in which she looks at gestures enacted by wrists, fingers, calves and feet in moments of togetherness. (Seen here: Sohrab Hura, ‘The green dress,’ 2022 – Ongoing)
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The body as a site of art: Experimenter has brought extremely thought-provoking works to the fair by artists like Sohrab Hura, Adip Dutta, Biraaj Dodiya, Julien Segard, Kallol Datta, Kanishka Raja, Praneet Soi, Sahil Naik, and more. Make sure to view the work, Self Portrait at Dawn, by Bhasha Chakrabarti, who is deeply interested in exploring the world through the body and the skin as a medium. Her ongoing show at Experimenter-Ballygunge Place, curated by Shaunak Mahbubani, reflects on this aspect of her practice, in which she looks at gestures enacted by wrists, fingers, calves and feet in moments of togetherness. (Seen here: Sohrab Hura, ‘The green dress,’ 2022 – Ongoing)
Mirroring reality: New York-based Israeli artist Yigal Ozeri is premiering his series, ‘Americana’ at the Bruno Art Group’s booth. The set of photo realistic works are dedicated to the ‘diner’ as an American pop culture icon. This year is all the more special as it marks the gallery’s tenth year of participation at the fair. Ozeri is known for his large-scale cinematic portraits of women framed against lush landscapes. “With tinges of Pre-Raphaelite aesthetics, Ozeri brings an ethereal and uninhibited sensibility to his paintings,” states the gallery note. 
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Mirroring reality: New York-based Israeli artist Yigal Ozeri is premiering his series, ‘Americana’ at the Bruno Art Group’s booth. The set of photo realistic works are dedicated to the ‘diner’ as an American pop culture icon. This year is all the more special as it marks the gallery’s tenth year of participation at the fair. Ozeri is known for his large-scale cinematic portraits of women framed against lush landscapes. “With tinges of Pre-Raphaelite aesthetics, Ozeri brings an ethereal and uninhibited sensibility to his paintings,” states the gallery note. 
New stories in miniature: Gallery Espace is presenting a new series of miniature paintings by Udaipur-based artist Waswo X Waswo. Titled ‘Last Ride in the Wild,Wild, East’, this new body of work features elements of realism with the fantastical. This series has been produced in collaboration with the 29 year old Chirag Kumawat, who is making his debut at the fair. As always, Waswo presents deeply-layered works, in which the unfamiliar shares space with recognisable imagery. (Seen here: Last Ride in the Wild Wild East (detail 1), 2022)
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New stories in miniature: Gallery Espace is presenting a new series of miniature paintings by Udaipur-based artist Waswo X Waswo. Titled ‘Last Ride in the Wild,Wild, East’, this new body of work features elements of realism with the fantastical. This series has been produced in collaboration with the 29 year old Chirag Kumawat, who is making his debut at the fair. As always, Waswo presents deeply-layered works, in which the unfamiliar shares space with recognisable imagery. (Seen here: Last Ride in the Wild Wild East (detail 1), 2022)
A different way of seeing: Akar Prakar is showcasing a set of works by artist Jayashree Chakravarty, who is known for her innovative techniques using organic material and paper. Especially interesting is her work, Rajbari, made with oil, acrylic, cotton, tea stain, grass, seeds, roots, jute and synthetic glue on canvas. One has to closely observe her creations to understand the many parts that come together as a whole. Nature and metamorphosis feature as themes in her practice in a big way—something that she attributes to the time spent in Santiniketan. Some of her other works at the fair include Simmering Synergies and Alien Sphere. 
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A different way of seeing: Akar Prakar is showcasing a set of works by artist Jayashree Chakravarty, who is known for her innovative techniques using organic material and paper. Especially interesting is her work, Rajbari, made with oil, acrylic, cotton, tea stain, grass, seeds, roots, jute and synthetic glue on canvas. One has to closely observe her creations to understand the many parts that come together as a whole. Nature and metamorphosis feature as themes in her practice in a big way—something that she attributes to the time spent in Santiniketan. Some of her other works at the fair include Simmering Synergies and Alien Sphere. 
Art that pulsates with energy: The Baroda-based artist, T Venkanna, is known for his powerful and fantastical imagery. His work, which is being shown by Gallery Maskara, represents “an uncommon expressive versatility and freedom of brushstroke to create a dreamlike atmosphere.” The gallery will also be unveiling a special work by Rooshad Shroff and Venkanna, called ‘PleasurePain’, with details of the latter’s drawings having been translated into a marble inlay on recycled old Burma teak wood with natural PU polish. 
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Art that pulsates with energy: The Baroda-based artist, T Venkanna, is known for his powerful and fantastical imagery. His work, which is being shown by Gallery Maskara, represents “an uncommon expressive versatility and freedom of brushstroke to create a dreamlike atmosphere.” The gallery will also be unveiling a special work by Rooshad Shroff and Venkanna, called ‘PleasurePain’, with details of the latter’s drawings having been translated into a marble inlay on recycled old Burma teak wood with natural PU polish. 
 A unique indigenous language: One can see the masterpieces of Indian folk and tribal art at the booth of Inherited Arts Forum. The presentation features works collected from the interiors of Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, created by artists like Balu Jivya Mashe, Bhuri Bai and Mangla Bai. The idea is to showcase the incomparable diversity and the extremely contemporary language of artists from the Bhil, Warli and Pithora traditions.  (Seen here: Mangla Bai, ‘Untitled’)
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 A unique indigenous language: One can see the masterpieces of Indian folk and tribal art at the booth of Inherited Arts Forum. The presentation features works collected from the interiors of Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and Maharashtra, created by artists like Balu Jivya Mashe, Bhuri Bai and Mangla Bai. The idea is to showcase the incomparable diversity and the extremely contemporary language of artists from the Bhil, Warli and Pithora traditions.  (Seen here: Mangla Bai, ‘Untitled’)
Making a strong statement: At the booth of Gallery Art and Soul, one can see a layered work by Mayuri Chari, in which text is juxtaposed against imagery on cloth. “I was not born in this society, I was created by the society,” read the words in one of the works. This creation is part of Object Making Exercises’, a dual solo of Upendra Ram and Chari, curated by Prabhakar Kamble. Both the artists are deeply embedded in the acts of the artisanal. “The works intend to narrate and speak with an audience whilst delving into the propositions of visuality of how we view the folk,  gender and the narrative in Rural India. Are these voices heard even when they hold aesthetical and conceptual merit within an art fair? States the note by Kamble. 
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Making a strong statement: At the booth of Gallery Art and Soul, one can see a layered work by Mayuri Chari, in which text is juxtaposed against imagery on cloth. “I was not born in this society, I was created by the society,” read the words in one of the works. This creation is part of Object Making Exercises’, a dual solo of Upendra Ram and Chari, curated by Prabhakar Kamble. Both the artists are deeply embedded in the acts of the artisanal. “The works intend to narrate and speak with an audience whilst delving into the propositions of visuality of how we view the folk,  gender and the narrative in Rural India. Are these voices heard even when they hold aesthetical and conceptual merit within an art fair? States the note by Kamble. 
A plurality of approach: Emami Art is presenting new works by ten contemporary artists, themed around pressing issues of the times such as agrarian politics, issues of sustainability and gender politics. One can see a mix of mid-career artists such as Soma Das with younger artists like Arpita Akhanda, Debashish Paul, Ujjal Dey, and more, working with diverse mediums ranging from textile, ceramics and printmaking to paper weaving and tempera painting. In a first, Emami Art will also be showcasing video works and sculptural dress engaging with issues of the body and identity. (Seen here: Arpita Akhanda's ‘Berunda’)
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A plurality of approach: Emami Art is presenting new works by ten contemporary artists, themed around pressing issues of the times such as agrarian politics, issues of sustainability and gender politics. One can see a mix of mid-career artists such as Soma Das with younger artists like Arpita Akhanda, Debashish Paul, Ujjal Dey, and more, working with diverse mediums ranging from textile, ceramics and printmaking to paper weaving and tempera painting. In a first, Emami Art will also be showcasing video works and sculptural dress engaging with issues of the body and identity. (Seen here: Arpita Akhanda's ‘Berunda’)

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Valentine's Day 2023 gift guide: Accessories wrapped in luxury

From sling bags to everyday shoes, here's a list of gifting ideas for her 

This silver plated purse by the brand JADE by Monica and Karishma, is chic and versatile enough to go with a sari as well as a pantsuit. Available on Jadebymk.com
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This silver plated purse by the brand JADE by Monica and Karishma, is chic and versatile enough to go with a sari as well as a pantsuit. Available on Jadebymk.com
This Eden pair by Nappa Dori can be the elegant everyday choice of footwear. Available on Nappadori.com
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This Eden pair by Nappa Dori can be the elegant everyday choice of footwear. Available on Nappadori.com
The Dyson Airwrap multi-styler has become a must-have for anyone who likes to experiment with different hairstyles. Available in Dyson stores and on www.dyson.in 
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The Dyson Airwrap multi-styler has become a must-have for anyone who likes to experiment with different hairstyles. Available in Dyson stores and on www.dyson.in 
This Pop My Heart pouch from Louis Vuitton, which screams V-Day, is crafted from quilted calf leather. It will be a cute addition to any casual outfit. Available on louisvuitton.com
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This Pop My Heart pouch from Louis Vuitton, which screams V-Day, is crafted from quilted calf leather. It will be a cute addition to any casual outfit. Available on louisvuitton.com
These delicate diamond-studded earrings can uplift any look. For details, visit www.instagram.com/chaulazheritagejewellery
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These delicate diamond-studded earrings can uplift any look. For details, visit www.instagram.com/chaulazheritagejewellery

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The most fashionable Grammys 2023 looks

From Cardi B to Harry Styles, celebrities made a grand style statement at the annual event 

Cardi B wore a gown by Gaurav Gupta, which he recently presented as part of his spring-summer couture collection at the Paris Haute Couture Week.
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Cardi B wore a gown by Gaurav Gupta, which he recently presented as part of his spring-summer couture collection at the Paris Haute Couture Week. (Getty Images via AFP)
Doja Cat paid tribute to an iconic Grammys looks (remember Jennifer Lopez's plunging Versace gown?) in a Roberto Cavalli gown with a moto jacket bodice unzipped to her navel and a skirt of neon feathers.
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Doja Cat paid tribute to an iconic Grammys looks (remember Jennifer Lopez's plunging Versace gown?) in a Roberto Cavalli gown with a moto jacket bodice unzipped to her navel and a skirt of neon feathers. (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Harry Styles' graphic, low-cut jumpsuit was made by Parisian label Egonlab.
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Harry Styles' graphic, low-cut jumpsuit was made by Parisian label Egonlab. (Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Beyonce became the most awarded artist in Grammys history after accepting her 32nd trophy at the event on 5 February.
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Beyonce became the most awarded artist in Grammys history after accepting her 32nd trophy at the event on 5 February. (REUTERS)

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Paris Haute Couture Week: Vaishali S. creates an underwater journey

The designer stays true to her signature style while offering new silhouettes and blends of shimmering materials 

The show took place in a room stripped of wallpaper, with rows of electrical wires visible.
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The show took place in a room stripped of wallpaper, with rows of electrical wires visible.
All the females models wore Kolhapuri chappals (from Vaishali’s hometown state), while walking in clothes were structured, yet flowy.
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All the females models wore Kolhapuri chappals (from Vaishali’s hometown state), while walking in clothes were structured, yet flowy.
Vaishali S. presented her collection, Abyss, on 24 January under the landmark, La Pyramide Inversée skylight, at Carrousel du Louvre. The collection included 35 garments, made using different silks and uplifted with traditional embroideries. 
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Vaishali S. presented her collection, Abyss, on 24 January under the landmark, La Pyramide Inversée skylight, at Carrousel du Louvre. The collection included 35 garments, made using different silks and uplifted with traditional embroideries. 
Vaishali S. greets the crowd after presenting her collection
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Vaishali S. greets the crowd after presenting her collection

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At Paris couture week, Rahul Mishra brings the universe alive in embroidery

The designer's collection, Cosmos, was a celebration of Indian hand-embroidery and craft techniques   

Rahul Mishra presented his couture collection at Paris' The Westin hotel on 23 January. 
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Rahul Mishra presented his couture collection at Paris' The Westin hotel on 23 January.  (Valerio Mezzanotti @nowfashion)
Each piece in the collection, made at his workshop in the Indian city of Noida, was realised in two and three-dimensional hand embroidery. 
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Each piece in the collection, made at his workshop in the Indian city of Noida, was realised in two and three-dimensional hand embroidery.  (AFP)
The embroidery was encrusted with Swarovski crystals, to give life to the elements of the world using threads.
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The embroidery was encrusted with Swarovski crystals, to give life to the elements of the world using threads. (AFP)
The collection included gowns, bodysuits and jackets.
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The collection included gowns, bodysuits and jackets. (Valerio Mezzanotti @nowfashion)
The custom-made shoes also grabbed attention with glitter-full heels. 
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The custom-made shoes also grabbed attention with glitter-full heels.  (Valerio Mezzanotti @nowfashion)

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Zângkhua, a Beacon of Hope, a Mizo folktale translated and illustrated by Alyssa Pachuau

An ancient Mizo folktale tells the story of how a young warrior’s spirit continues to watch over his people

According to Mizo folklore, Zângkhua, or the constellation Ursa Major, is the spirit of a young warrior named Kawlawia. The constellation consists of seven bright arsi (stars) and is one of the most prominent clusters that appear in the north. Our ancestors possessed remarkable wisdom about the world, including stars and constellations. The Mizo elders keenly observed the appearance of these celestial bodies to track time, months and seasons, and read them as signs of good or bad fortune to come. They established their own theories of origin, resulting in interesting myths, lore and legends. This folktale tells the origin of the constellation Zângkhua, and how it became one of the most significant “stars” among the Mizo people.
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According to Mizo folklore, Zângkhua, or the constellation Ursa Major, is the spirit of a young warrior named Kawlawia. The constellation consists of seven bright arsi (stars) and is one of the most prominent clusters that appear in the north. Our ancestors possessed remarkable wisdom about the world, including stars and constellations. The Mizo elders keenly observed the appearance of these celestial bodies to track time, months and seasons, and read them as signs of good or bad fortune to come. They established their own theories of origin, resulting in interesting myths, lore and legends. This folktale tells the origin of the constellation Zângkhua, and how it became one of the most significant “stars” among the Mizo people. (Illustrations by Alyssa Pachuau)
Once upon a time, there lived a man named Kawlawia (pronounced Koloya) in Mizoram. He married a young woman from the village of Sairum, which lies east of the Tlawng river. One night, Kawlawia dreamt a terrible dream that he believed foreshadowed his death. “Go to your in-laws’ village and offer a sacrifice. Tragedy will not befall you,” the village elders said. He decided to go to Sairum to perform a thla hual, a ceremony where a sacrifice is offered to pacify one’s mind.
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Once upon a time, there lived a man named Kawlawia (pronounced Koloya) in Mizoram. He married a young woman from the village of Sairum, which lies east of the Tlawng river. One night, Kawlawia dreamt a terrible dream that he believed foreshadowed his death. “Go to your in-laws’ village and offer a sacrifice. Tragedy will not befall you,” the village elders said. He decided to go to Sairum to perform a thla hual, a ceremony where a sacrifice is offered to pacify one’s mind.
At Sairum, Kawlawia’s in-laws sacrificed a young fowl and a pig for the thla hual ceremony. He felt a sense of peace almost immediately, and set off for his home. On the way back, as he reached Berhvakawn, Kawlawia was waylaid by warriors from another village. And just like he had dreamt, he was killed, and the enemies carried off his head and leg as trophies. 
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At Sairum, Kawlawia’s in-laws sacrificed a young fowl and a pig for the thla hual ceremony. He felt a sense of peace almost immediately, and set off for his home. On the way back, as he reached Berhvakawn, Kawlawia was waylaid by warriors from another village. And just like he had dreamt, he was killed, and the enemies carried off his head and leg as trophies. 
After a few days, a tlaiberh (Red-vented bulbul) appeared at Kawlawia’s house and perched on a bamboo clothesline by the doorway. “Kawlawia lies dead at Berhvakawn,” the tlaiberh called. When they heard its song, Kawlawia’s family became anxious. “What a strange song the tlaiberh sings,” they said. 
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After a few days, a tlaiberh (Red-vented bulbul) appeared at Kawlawia’s house and perched on a bamboo clothesline by the doorway. “Kawlawia lies dead at Berhvakawn,” the tlaiberh called. When they heard its song, Kawlawia’s family became anxious. “What a strange song the tlaiberh sings,” they said. 
Finally, they sent some young warriors to Berhvakawn who found Kawlawia’s body. A small swarm of khawidang (wasps) was hovering over his knee where his leg had been severed. 
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Finally, they sent some young warriors to Berhvakawn who found Kawlawia’s body. A small swarm of khawidang (wasps) was hovering over his knee where his leg had been severed. 
As they stood over his body, there occurred a great gathering of darkness: the Thîm-Zîng. It appeared like a great black fog that covered the world in darkness. In that moment, Kawlawia’s body rose to the sky and turned into a cluster of stars that came to be known as Zângkhua. In this constellation, the first two stars, or “point stars”, are believed to be his shoulders, and the rest his torso and remaining leg. Till today, it is said wasps are flitting around his knee and can be seen blinking in the distance.
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As they stood over his body, there occurred a great gathering of darkness: the Thîm-Zîng. It appeared like a great black fog that covered the world in darkness. In that moment, Kawlawia’s body rose to the sky and turned into a cluster of stars that came to be known as Zângkhua. In this constellation, the first two stars, or “point stars”, are believed to be his shoulders, and the rest his torso and remaining leg. Till today, it is said wasps are flitting around his knee and can be seen blinking in the distance.
When Zângkhua turns upside down, it is common knowledge that it won’t be long before dawn. In hard times, it’s common to say “Zângkhua a la bungbu ang”, which means Zângkhua will turn upside down to bolster people’s spirits and indicate that things will change for the better.
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When Zângkhua turns upside down, it is common knowledge that it won’t be long before dawn. In hard times, it’s common to say “Zângkhua a la bungbu ang”, which means Zângkhua will turn upside down to bolster people’s spirits and indicate that things will change for the better.
When Zângkhua turns upside down, it is common knowledge that it won’t be long before dawn. In hard times, it’s common to say “Zângkhua a la bungbu ang”, which means Zângkhua will turn upside down to bolster people’s spirits and indicate that things will change for the better.
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When Zângkhua turns upside down, it is common knowledge that it won’t be long before dawn. In hard times, it’s common to say “Zângkhua a la bungbu ang”, which means Zângkhua will turn upside down to bolster people’s spirits and indicate that things will change for the better.
Zângkhua not only tells the time and seasons, the stars themselves give hope to those who look upon them. They are a constant reminder that darkness will eventually give way to light and wrongs will be made right.  Alyssa Pachuau is a New York-based children’s illustrator. Her first picture book, Ukepenuopfü, with author Theyiesinuo Keditsu was published in 2022. 
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Zângkhua not only tells the time and seasons, the stars themselves give hope to those who look upon them. They are a constant reminder that darkness will eventually give way to light and wrongs will be made right.  Alyssa Pachuau is a New York-based children’s illustrator. Her first picture book, Ukepenuopfü, with author Theyiesinuo Keditsu was published in 2022. 

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